Volunteering Highlight for Pre-Medicine Students

For Pre-Medicine students, having a well rounded resume is essential. Have you ever thought about volunteering by doing something that will get you medical experience outside of the hospital? UIowa Mobile Clinic does just this.

The mission of UIowa Mobile Clinic is to provide health screening and services to under-served populations within the Iowa City area. During each free visit, a patient will have the opportunity to undergo blood glucose testing for a diabetes screening, blood pressure and vitals screening, cholesterol screenings, health education, and physician services. Some clinics even offer flu shots, HIV & Hepatitis C testing, dental services, social work, and physical therapy evaluations. All clinics are in a non-hospital setting, and as the name “Mobile Clinic” describes, everything we do is mobile. We unload materials from a car at the beginning of the day, and load the car back up at the end.

So what can you, as a University of Iowa undergraduate student, do without medical school experience? The answer is more than you think. With proper training (which is not time consuming at all) you can become an EMR (Electronic Medical Record) Expert, an interpreter (for languages of Spanish, Arabic, and/or French), a scribe, an HIV/HCV screener, a patient educator, or a patient advocate. You could even run the labs or vitals station!

The great thing about Mobile Clinic is that you can volunteer in any position you are trained for and as much as you want. Of course you can only volunteer at the times and locations clinics are offered, but there are so many options to choose from. My best advice is train early. At the beginning of the semester, there is always a big rush of people who hear about Mobile Clinic for the first time and this causes a flood of people finishing training quickly and filling up all the volunteer slots.

In my experience with Mobile Clinic, I became trained on all the positions I could, but I have only worked (so far) as a scribe and as the volunteer who runs the lab station. I fell in love with these positions so much that I really wanted to focus on just these jobs rather than bouncing around from place to place. Being a scribe is so far my favorite position. I get to stay with current medical students and physicians, take notes for them, and still get to visit patients personally. In addition to this, I sometimes even get to practice my Spanish. I am by no means ready to be an interpreter, but a little practice never hurts.

As a first year college student getting hands on clinical experience such as this, I feel privileged not only to volunteer doing something I love but also to be helping others in the process. Where else are you able to go to college and do these kinds of things as a freshman undergraduate student outside of a hospital and at your own time?

If you are interested in learning more about mobile clinic’s mission, services, or volunteering program, learn more about the Iowa Mobile Clinic.

 

 

My First Dance Marathon

Dance Marathon is the largest student organization at the University of Iowa. Every year this organization graciously raises funds FTK (For The Kids) fighting pediatric cancer in the University of Iowa’s Stead Family Children’s Hospital, celebrates those winning their battle against pediatric cancer, and remembers the kids who are now dancing in our hearts. Dance Marathon has now been striving to fight pediatric cancer for 27 years, and in the process, students have raised and collected over $30 million in donations. Needless to say, this organization fights strongly.

Throughout the typical, non-pandemic year, students interact with the patients at the hospital in a variety of ways. Mostly by checking in with them, playing games, and of course dancing. A variety of events are held throughout the year for these strong kids, but this year looked a little different.

Without being able to interact in person, a lot of virtual activities took place. By meeting up with families over Zoom, or by sending a virtual wave, dancers did everything they could this year to continue showing their love and support not only for the kids but for their families, too.

Instead of having the typical 24-hour event in person, a live stream appeared this year so everyone can celebrate virtually. We watched 9 kids graduate 5 years of cancer treatment, we listened to countless family’s fighting stories, we cheered on kids as they performed their talents in a talent show, and of course, we danced! A pandemic certainly did not stop this year’s celebration FTK, it only altered it. We rose with resilience to alter how we experienced the big event this year, but we have to remember sometimes the families we support can only attend virtually in a typical year due to their child’s health status.

This is what made the event so special. Even though we were not all in the same space, we all celebrated in the same way. We all fought for the kids. We all praised the families for their strength. We all remembered those that are dancing in our hearts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I joined Dance Marathon I chose to join miracle group two, because two was the number of my father’s favorite NASCAR driver. I lost my father to cancer, so the fight is important to me. Being apart of group two reminds me of why the battle is important and maybe even personal for every single person taking part in this student organization. Whether we joined because we knew someone personally affected by cancer, or simply want to stop anyone from having to fight this battle, we all are here for the same cause: to fight for a cure so no one, especially the kids, has to go through this battle.

Of course, I can’t talk about UIDM27 without telling you all how much our tote board revealed. This year, we raised $1,422,443.27 all FTK! In addition to raising funds, UIDM27 had their first official Move-A-Thon this year where over 4 million miles walked, ran, or cycled we made in name of the kids!

Even though my first year being apart of this organization was virtual, I wouldn’t take the experience back for the world. I got to meet so many wonderful people, find supporters from all over the country, talk to the strongest kids I have ever met, and of course, celebrate with them all of our hard work. I can’t wait to see what next year brings!

To learn more about Dance Marathon at the University of Iowa, click here. You can learn about individual families we support and their stories, individual dancers and their fundraising efforts, about the programs we sponsor FTK, and of course how you can make a difference!

Time Management Tips for College

College is where you test your time management skills. You have to attend classes, complete projects, and study while also potentially managing work, internships, research positions, club meetings, volunteer work, scholarship applications, and more. So, how do you do it all, keep your sanity, have time to hang out with your friends, and have time for yourself? Here are some tips:

1.) Make a calendar

I like making a digital calendar on my laptop that syncs to my phone so I have it everywhere I go. If you have Apple products, the pre-installed calendar app works great for this!

I recommend adding everything you can to the calendar. Your class schedule, discussion times, labs, student organization meetings, volunteering times, your work schedule, and whatever else you can think of. Adding test dates and office hours are also good reminders to stay on top of your work and to check in with your professors.

2.) Stay on task and give yourself motivation

If you set aside time to do something, do it. If you don’t, it may throw off your schedule later. To keep yourself on task, reward your progress. This is a way for you to stay motivated. It can be as simple as getting yourself some coffee.

3.) Don’t pack your schedule too soon

Start your schedule with your classes and a few things you greatly care about. Then, add smaller things such as student organizations and volunteering opportunities as you can handle them. Adding to your schedule slowly will help prevent you from overwhelming yourself.

4.) Prepare for your day the night before

Set out your clothes the night before, have your book bag packed, and make sure all your assignments are done on time (before midnight). This will allow for your day to flow smoothly and you will not have to rush at any point to get ready after staying up late doing work.

5.) Make a routine for weekly things

Little things add up, and forgetting to account for time to do things like your laundry or taking out the trash can cause clutter until you find time to deal with it. Don’t let chores slip your mind and cause stress later. Make a day of the week chore day, or ascribe a chore to a day of the week.

First Semester of College Reflection

Hello Hawkeyes,

I have officially finished my first semester of college, so what did I learn?

1.) College is what you make of it

Going to college just to go is not an experience. The fun you will remember is from the effort you make putting yourself out there for the world to see. Make friends, join clubs, attend campus events. But, whatever you do, just do something.

Goal for next semester: Attend more club events and talk to mentors more.

2.) Change up your study spot

Studying outside of your living space will help alleviate distractions. I study at the Iowa Memorial Union because of its proximity to me and because I can change up my study spot a lot within one building just by going to a different room.

Goal for next semester: Try studying somewhere new every week.

3.) Find friends that will hold you accountable

Friends will help keep you going in a social or school setting. Having friends that know you well enough to study, attend meetings, or work out with you will help in motivation and sticking to a schedule.

Goal for next semester: Branch out and find more people I have things in common with.

4.) Stay organized

College will keep you busy. Between classes, work, studying, eating, workouts, and meetings, you may not have much time for yourself. Keep an updated schedule and a clean room. This will allow you to know what you are doing, when, and where your stuff is.

Goal for next semester: Clean out my desk drawers and keep them clean!

5.) Set goals

Goals will keep you motivated with what you want the most. Be brave, daring, and work towards self-improvement. Setting an “outrageous” goal isn’t scary if you break it down step by step, so shoot for the stars.

Goal for next semester: Keep an updated goal sheet on my desk.

 

What should I do in-between my college classes?

Time management is essential in college. You need to be productive, but you also need to have time for yourself, so what should you be doing in that awkward hour-or-so break between your classes?

Depending on how long your break is, here are some ideas:

    • Are you just exhausted from the week? Grab some coffee, a smoothie, a snack, or even an early meal before your next class. It is important for your body to get the energy it needs to get you through the rest of the day-needless to say your next class. At the University of Iowa, Dunkin Donuts is my go-to coffee spot and it is just right across the street from the Pentacrest.
    • Get some exercise by taking the long way to your next class. This way you can explore your surroundings and visit a part of campus that you may never go by. I had some extra time between my classes recently, so I grabbed some coffee and took the long way to class. I ended up walking by the back side of the Pentacrest, which was decorated for Veteran’s Day. ¬†I never really have to take a route to class that passes this area of campus, so I got to see something new I would have otherwise not been able to experience.
    • Go to office hours or set up a meeting with an advisor. How long has it been since you checked in with your professors or advisor? Take some time to catch up.
    • Run some errands that you have been pushing off. Do you need to grab a few things from the store? Or do you have to drop off a few things in a building you don’t normally go to? Take the time now to knock out a few of those errands.
    • Refresh your memory with a quick study session. Go to class early and study your notes, or sit outside if it is a nice day. There are plenty of beautiful study spots around campus!
    • Take some time for yourself. College is stressful, so you can’t forget to take care of yourself. Take a nap to catch up on your sleep or relax by watching some TV.
    • Say hello to your friends. People will not have the same schedule as you, so take advantage of the breaks you have at the same time as your friends.
    • Check your email. In college, it is important to stay up to date with your email. After all, it is how many of your professors and student organizations will communicate with you.
    • Do your laundry. Do not wait until Sunday night to do your laundry, the laundry room is just too busy then! Get your laundry done when you get the opportunity.
    • Update your resume, LinkedIn, work files, and more. It is important to have yourself organized and prepared for applications and interviews. You never know when an opportunity will arise.

Advice for a First Generation College Student

How do you stay afloat, updated, and on track? Going to college is a challenge on its own, but to go to college and have no family member to rely on for college experience questions makes it even harder.

I am a first generation college student, and sometimes I feel like I blend in to the crowd, but many times I feel like I am out of the loop. I’m not going to lie, trying to figure out how college works on your own is hard. There are going to be times of shock where you learn something that everyone else just seems to know. But hey, you have to start somewhere.

My advice to you is to get involved and meet with as many advisors and professors as you can.

Getting involved in student organizations, Greek life, or even volunteering will give you a sense of community. Just like Greek life, many student organizations assign newcomers a “big” or a “parent”, which is like a student mentor for the organization itself, but these are also people you will grow close with and be able to ask a variety of questions to.

However, you are not limited to just asking questions to this mentor figure. Joining any community or group on campus of any sort will provide you someone to talk to. Just find someone you bond with. Don’t be afraid to be outgoing, and if needed, start the conversation yourself. “Hi, I’m new here,” is not a bad thing to say, and in fact that’s how I got pointed towards some of the best and most knowledgeable people I have met. It seems like everyone will excitedly talk about themselves and their college experiences, so learn from this. Even if they are a freshman, maybe they know a fun fact about the university, a neat program offered, or a cool study spot that you don’t know about. Take knowledge from anyone.

The University of Iowa offers a Living Learning Community for first generation college students. This means you will live on a residence hall floor with people just like you. You will learn together about the college experience. To learn more about the First Generation LLC, click here.

Also sponsored by the University of Iowa is the Iowa Edge program. This is an orientation to campus and college life.

As for meeting with advisors, this is crucial for first-year college students. Academic advisors will keep you on track to graduate and provide you with various opportunities that you may have never known to exist. This can range from first generation college student support groups, scholarships, or even simply something your advisor believes you may find interesting. Your academic advisor will be your greatest asset to guiding your college experiences. Of course, schedule however many meetings you are required to have, but schedule a few more. Really get to know your advisor so they can help you in the best way they see fit. After all, they are the one person on campus who seems up to date and knowledgeable on everything.

As for other advisors, this can range from professors to program mentors. Really, anyone can be an advising figure, you just have to meet with them regularly and ask them to share their knowledge. I have found going to professor office hours and just having a conversation with them has provided me a lot of knowledge about the university that I would have not otherwise gained, so don’t be afraid just to talk. It doesn’t have to be a formal advisor-advisee format.

Overall, my advice to you as a first generation college student is to be outgoing and meet with as many people as you can. You learn through experience, so don’t let an opportunity pass you by.

If you would like to learn more about being a first generation student at the University of Iowa, click here.

For resources to look into, click here.

Study Spots at the University of Iowa

Have you found your favorite study spot on campus yet? Looking to change things up a bit? Check out some of my favorite study spots below!

Student involvement at the University of Iowa

Coming from a smaller high school, I was able to participate in just about every club my school offered. However, I knew in college I was going to have to find out specifically what I was interested in, because there were going to be a lot more options on the table and it would be impossible to be involved in everything. I looked at what I participated in high school, and out of these activities, I personally enjoyed National Honors Society, Key Club, and Dance Team the most. In all honesty, I wanted to continue these activities, and in college it is possible, but in a different form.

How to get involved:

I highly recommend going to a student organization fair to browse options and check out specific student organizations. The University of Iowa’s Fall of 2020 Student Organization fair has passed, but you can view all of the organizations here. This is how I found contact information for a handful of student organizations I knew I was interested in, and how I explored my options. Looking through these organizations really helped me decide what I wanted to truly be a part of.

In addition to the complete list of organizations, students will get emails directly from a variety of clubs sent to their student email addresses. Going through these emails (as tedious as it sounds) will help you look more in-depth at what various student organizations support and do around Iowa City. Going through all emails provides another outlet for students to get involved on campus. Often job opportunities, volunteer positions, and social event information are sent to student email addresses.

Intramural sports are another way to get involved on campus in a sport of your choice. Anything you can imagine from esports to intramural volleyball is offered, so there seems to be something for everyone. More can be read about intramural sports here.

Finally, After Class is a great webpage to look at what’s going on around campus. Much of the intramural sports, social events, on-campus job advertisements, and even event fairs (such as the study abroad fair) are featured on this website. It is great for students wishing to get involved on campus, even just to get out for one night as an impromptu decision. There is probably something going on.

What I got involved in and how:

  • Phi Sigma Pi (PSP) is an honors fraternity I found that reminds me of National Honors Society, but I think PSP seems to have a broader reach than National Honors Society because it seems to be more relationship focused. In this group, friendships and connections seem to be built all over the place as leadership, scholarship, and fellowship is explored. I found this student organization by checking my student email, but it is also listed on the complete list of student organizations.
  • Alpha Phi Omega is another fraternity on campus, but this one is a service fraternity (all about volunteerism). This is one of the student organizations I knew about prior to attending the student organization fair since an advisor from my high school recommended to me (I am an avid volunteer in my community back home). So, if you are into volunteering, I highly recommend checking this group out.
  • Circle K is a student organization that is in close relation to the high school clubs titled Key Club. Circle K is simply the college equivalent of this group if you are familiar with that high school club, but if not, it is another volunteering group.
  • Medicus and the Minority Association for Pre-Medical Students (MAPS) are two groups that I stumbled upon while browsing the complete list of student organizations. Both of these groups focus on pre-health students, guide them through some processes in relation to their academic track, and provide countless resources to help distribute beneficial information about the pre-health tracks and career fields.
  • The University of Iowa Dance Club is another group I just happened to stumble upon during a student organization search. Since I knew I loved dance in high school, I wanted to continue my experience in college and I found this group as the perfect way to do so. This student organization holds dance classes of multiple styles throughout the week, and functions off of a schedule where you simply show up to whatever class you desire to take. This could be one class a week, or ten! Personally, I love the aspect of schedule flexibility in this student organization, because it allows me to spend time doing other things around campus as well.

  • The Microbiology Undergraduate Student Association is a student organization I joined to be more in close relations to my major. I found this student organization during the student organization fair, but it is listed on the student organization list as well. As a microbiology major, I joined this group to find people who not only share the same academic interests as me, but also possible career paths.
  • Dance Marathon is the largest student organization on campus, and I joined because I have a passion for helping anyone in need. Being able to raise money for kids in need, help families in the pediatric hospital on campus, and being a part of a group dedicated strictly to this sparked my interest. Of course the big event (a 24-hour dance marathon) sounds impossible to miss as well! I heard about this student organization when I toured Iowa, and it comes up quite often in conversations and through media.

Overall, the University of Iowa hosts countless opportunities for student involvement, but not solely in student organizations. Finding something to do here is easy, because as a student you just have to figure out what you would like to participate in. If it isn’t an option, you can make it one.