Getting Involved: Student Organizations

One of the easiest ways to get involved and make friends is to join one, or several, student organizations on campus.

There are over 500 student organizations to choose from at the University of Iowa, ranging from hundreds of members to only a few.

As a double major in Sport and Recreation Management and Journalism and Mass Communication, my interests include things like marketing, public relations, and journalism.

Current Student Orgs

I’m currently a member of these two student orgs.

Sport and Recreation Management Club

“The mission of the organization is to further the professional development of The University of Iowa Sport and Recreation Management students. It provides a platform for people to network amongst others in the program, gain valuable experience alongside program courses, and learn more about the local Iowa sports community.”

This student org is in its first year at the University of Iowa, and is always looking to add more members. I found out about it through one of the SRM (Sport and Recreation Management) classes I was taking during first semester.

During meetings, we often have a guest speaker and talk about upcoming networking events or ways to volunteer with the athletic department. I currently hold the Sports Information Chair, but, due to schedule conflicts, my attendance at meetings is limited this semester.

KRUI

“KRUI provides a real opportunity for students to be introduced to the radio broadcasting field. Although the University offers courses in radio broadcasting and audio journalism, only KRUI gives all students a chance to go beyond the classroom and experience the live atmosphere of broadcasting while still in school. Exposure to these actual situations allows students to gain confidence in themselves and their skills.”

KRUI happens to be the second largest student organization on campus. I found out about it through my Hawkeye Guide during orientation, who had been trying to recruit more members. He’s currently the Sports Director.

I joined specifically to write about sports online, but, admittedly, I have been slacking when it comes to that (really, really slacking). I also have the opportunity to produce athletic events or go on-air and talk about sports.

Future Student Orgs

I plan on becoming a member of these two student orgs within the next year.

PRSSA

“The University of Iowa Public Relations Student Society of America is a pre-professional organization for University of Iowa students interested in the field of public relations.”

I actually first found out about PRSSA by searching the web for ways to get involved in public relations and marketing at the University of Iowa. I’ve had other people recommend it to me since then.

It’s a great way to network, get tips for success, build a resume, and gain experience.

STAR

“STAR assists the Office of Admission in the recruitment of high school, transfer and non-traditional students through programs, activities, and events. We provide information about The University of Iowa’s programs, services, and special opportunities to prospective students and their families. STAR promotes The University of Iowa through contact with other students, parents, and alumni.”

I found out about STAR through the Office of Admissions’ Communications Coordinator when I was looking for ways to get involved with marketing.

This is a good way to gain some experience.

Honorable Mentions

These aren’t technically student orgs, but I wanted to include them.

The Daily Iowan

This is a student newspaper that works out of the Adler Journalism Building. It’s run by students and is independent from the University of Iowa. It’s definitely the best way to get your foot in the door on campus when it comes to journalism and communications.

I found out about The Daily Iowan during my campus visit junior year of high school. I planned on joining during my first year, but it hasn’t been in the cards for me yet. As of right now, I’m aiming to apply at the beginning of next school year.

Admissions Blogger

I found out about blogging for the Office of Admissions towards the beginning of my senior year of high school (don’t quote me on that). I really enjoyed reading the experiences of last year’s bloggers and I love writing, so I figured it would be the perfect opportunity for me.

And now here I am.

 

Thank you for reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

College Q&A: Here’s The Truth

By this time last year, I knew where I would be attending college.

It came down to a battle between the University of Iowa and Florida State University. Truth be told, despite being born and raised in Iowa, FSU had been my dream school for as long as I can remember (for many reasons).

In the end, I chose the University of Iowa because of its location (it’s a lot closer to home) and cost of attendance (out-of-state tuition is insane), and because it felt like a place I could call home when I visited during my junior year of high school.

Let this be known: I don’t regret my decision of choosing Iowa over Florida State. Not even a little bit. (OK, maybe a tiny bit on days when it’s below zero here and I check the weather in Tallahassee.) It was the best decision for me at this point in my life, and I’m happy to call Iowa City my home.

I’ve truly grown to love the University of Iowa since starting classes a few months ago. I love the campus. I love the faculty. I love my classes. I love my job.

And I’m not just saying this because I blog for Iowa Admissions. It really is a university anyone would be happy and proud to say they will graduate (or have graduated) from.

Despite visiting and making the decision to attend the University of Iowa, I still had a lot of questions. I’ve thought back to this time last year and decided to answer the questions I had (as well as other random ones) with the knowledge I have about the University of Iowa today.

Did I make the right decision when choosing between schools?

I know I already touched on this, but I wanted to add on to what I said.

It’s not the end of the world if you don’t attend your “dream school.” Dreams change all the time, and chances are you’ll love the school you choose just as much…if not more.

I’m going to be completely honest and tell you I really struggled with this decision. When I accepted my offer of admission to the University of Iowa, I spent days scolding myself for giving up on my dream. It took me a while to realize I hadn’t given up on my dream, but that I was putting that specific dream on hold. I wasn’t ready to move 1,200 miles away from home. I also didn’t want to go that far in student loan debt. In the end, I made a decision that was right for me and I’m happy.

It may sound ridiculous, but weigh the pros and cons of the colleges you’re choosing between. Rory Gilmore did it in “Gilmore Girls” when deciding between Harvard, her dream school, and Yale. (I won’t spoil which school she chose.) Decide what’s most important to you, and go with it.

I came to terms with my decision when I realized I have another dream—a bigger dream—that involves working for a collegiate or professional sports organization. In fact, I wouldn’t even call it a dream. It’s an end goal (an outcome I won’t compromise) for me, and college is a means goal (a path in which to reach my end goal). The college I attend isn’t going to stop me from reaching my end goal, but how I spend my time in college can.

In the spirit of full disclosure, Florida State is a dream I’ll probably never give up. Because who knows? Maybe someday it’ll be in the cards for me.

What I do know is this: I will be proud, and privileged, to graduate and have a degree from the University of Iowa. What I do with that degree, however, is up to me.

Do I have to choose a major right away?

No. Maybe I’m wrong, but I feel like most people wait a year or two to decide on their major. Work on completing the general education requirements and think about what your interests are, where you see yourself in ten years, and so on.

And if you do pick a major but want to change it later on, then change it. Talk to your advisor. Talk to your parents. You’ll be fine.

I came into college knowing I would double major in Sport and Recreation Management and Journalism and Mass Communication. It wasn’t a hard decision for me, but it can be for others. It’s scary to think about what you might be doing for the rest of your life.

(I will talk more independently about my majors and the opportunities they provide in the future, specifically the Sport and Recreation Management program.)

What if I can’t find someone to room with and I get randomly matched?

Searching for a roommate is an awkward experience, or at least it was for me. It felt weird messaging and talking to random girls about possibly being roommates. Eventually I decided I’d let fate run its course.

I’m thankful to say my roommate and I get along incredibly well. We went to schools that played each other in some sports, and we have quite a bit in common. I’d go as far to say one of the biggest differences between the two of us is that she’s a Green Bay Packers fan and I’m a Minnesota Vikings fan, but we make it work.

I may have lucked out in the roommate department because I have heard horror stories about getting randomly matched. Just remember, it’s only temporary and, if you don’t get along, you can always swap rooms.

How do I manage my time?

That’s a good question, and I’m still trying to figure it out.

There are a lot of ways to keep track of your time, but actually getting in the habit of doing it is the hard part. You can use the calendar on your phone, a physical calendar, a planner, a bullet journal, and the list goes on.

It’s all about figuring out what works for you and getting in the habit of doing it.

Should I get a job?

Technically, I had a job during my first semester at the University of Iowa, but I was only a volunteer (I will start getting paid in Fall of 2018).

In general, I think it’s fine to wait a semester or two before getting a job unless you absolutely need one. And when you do decide to look around, you can use Hire A Hawk to help.

 

How are classes different from high school?

The easiest answer is they’re harder. You have to put more time in when it comes to assignments, papers, and studying for tests. If you fall behind, it can be really hard to catch back up.

What’s my favorite class and why?

I only have one full semester under my belt, but I’ll go with Introduction to the Politics of Race. It fulfilled a Gen Ed requirement, and it was unrelated to my major, but it’s a class I think everyone should take. I learned a lot about race, mass incarceration, and immigration law.

How is college in general different from high school?

You have a lot more “free” time. When I was in high school, I was stuck at school from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and after school was time for extracurricular activities or work.

When it comes to college, your classes are more spread out. You might have three on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and only one on Mondays and Wednesdays. You have all this open space on your schedule to do whatever you want, right?

Wrong.

You still have homework (readings, assignments, papers). You still have extracurricular activities. You still have work.

So it’s up to you to make sure you spend your “free” time the right way before you sit back and relax.

Is the food good?

In the dining halls/market places, it’s all-you-can-eat. One day you can eat a salad, and the next you can have a plate full of pizza. Or you can have salad and pizza all at once. It’s really up to you. If you ever want to see the options you’ll have to choose from, take a look at the menus for the three dining halls on campus.

There are a lot of non-dining halls to choose from when it comes to places to eat on campus. My favorites so far are the Street Hawk Food Truck and Union Station. I’ve heard that River Room Cafe and Black’s Gold Grill are good, but I haven’t eaten at either one yet.

I will say this: There are a lot of places to eat on and around campus, but dining hall food can get a little old after a while. Try to switch it up every once in a while.

Do I need a car?

No. At least not as a freshman.

If you want to go home, someone can come pick you up or you can catch a ride with another student. Or you can buy a plane ticket, if necessary.

Bringing a car means having to spend more money, and we’re already spending enough as is. Honestly, Iowa’s campus is close enough to everything you might need and more.

 

How do I get around campus?

A combination of walking and using the Cambus. You can download an app for the bus schedule, and you’ll catch on quickly to which routes you need to use. A lot of people have a moped, but I don’t have a very good history with them.

Getting around campus is not as hard as some people make it seem.

Should I purchase season tickets for football and basketball?

YES. All other athletic events are free for students, but I definitely recommend getting season tickets for football and basketball.

I didn’t have to purchase season tickets for football because of my job, but I would have if I needed to. The environment is insane. Kinnick Stadium is one of the toughest places to play—just ask Michigan and Ohio State. You definitely want to be a part of that, even if you’re not a huge football fan.

Thank you for reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

 

Life at Iowa: January 2018

I’m going to be trying something new this semester. I will be using an app called 1 Second Everyday, which allows me to take a one-second clip each day, to share my everyday life as a student at the University of Iowa. At the beginning of each month, I will mash together all of the clips from the previous month and give a short-ish recap.

I wanted to do this last semester as well, but I was adjusting to life as a college student and it just didn’t work out.

So, without further ado…

January 2018 was all about getting back into the groove of classes and extracurricular activities. I ordered my textbooks for the semester, walked to class in the snow, and started waking up early enough to eat breakfast at Hillcrest Market Place almost every day.

I experienced what it’s like to be crammed on the Cambus with no room to move at all because no one wants to walk in the cold (and we’re probably feeling a little lazy after a long day of classes).

I started volunteering at Iowa athletic events for the Fans First Practicum. The hours are long, and constantly smiling at strangers and answering their questions can be tiring at times, but it’s worth it in more ways than one. Thankfully, I did still manage to catch two men’s basketball games as a regular fan.

After two and a half weeks of classes, I’m looking forward to the many weeks ahead.

Next month: Sport and Recreation Management field trip to Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Thank you for reading and watching! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

A Semester of Trial and Error

They say you learn a lot about yourself during college, and I definitely learned a lot about myself (and life) through trial and error during my first semester at the University of Iowa. I was away from home for the first time, experiencing life on my own, and I had absolutely no clue what I was doing.

So I tried different ways of doing things. Sometimes I was successful, and sometimes I failed. But I learned a lot – that’s what matters.

Before I get into the main part of this post, one thing I learned about myself is that I really, really love lists. To-do lists, TV show lists, book lists, bucket lists, blog post lists, and so on.

So, in list form, here are the most important things I learned during my first semester of college:

Study, study, study

I didn’t expect college to be easy. I knew it was going to be harder than high school.

And I knew I was being ridiculous when I didn’t really study for a few of my midterms, but I thought maybe – just maybe – my scores would be fine despite not studying. But I was wrong. 

I got my act together after that and studied for my finals, and I did well. 

Had I studied for those midterms, I definitely had a good shot at a 4.0 GPA. But I didn’t, so the only thing I can do now is make sure I study smart for all future exams. 

It’s easy to fall behind

I procrastinated. A lot. 

And it’s really easy to fall behind in college. Professors aren’t going to stop and wait for you to catch up. (But you can go to office hours for extra help!)

It was stressful having to rush to write papers and put together presentations at the last minute. I’d like to avoid doing that next semester.

Ask for help if you need it

There’s no shame in needing help, whether it’s academic or mental. 

Go to office hours. Get a tutor. See a therapist.

Do whatever it takes to be successful, but make sure you’re healthy while doing it.

Don’t put yourself down

Perfection doesn’t exist. You can try to be perfect, but you’re only setting yourself up for disappointment.

Don’t put yourself down if you don’t get an A or a B. Don’t put yourself down if you struggle in an “easy course.” Don’t put yourself down if you have to withdraw from a course for whatever reason. Don’t put yourself down if you decide to change your major.

College is the time to find yourself. You’re going to make mistakes. You’re going to change your mind. And it’s perfectly normal to do so.

Stop being afraid

Go outside of your comfort zone once in a while. Put yourself out there to truly experience life. 

In the sports industry, making connections and knowing the right people is incredibly important. I have to put myself out there, and that’s not something I’m used to doing.

I missed out on a couple opportunities during first semester because I was too “afraid” to go outside my comfort zone, but I’m aiming to change that during second semester.

Rent textbooks online

Last semester, I rented textbooks through a site called Chegg. It’s a lot cheaper than buying textbooks at list price because you can save up to 90%.

When it’s time to return the books, you can print off a prepaid shipping label and drop the box off at the nearest UPS location. And you can highlight the rental books (just don’t write in them).

I’ll be using Chegg again for textbooks during the spring semester.

Don’t rush into getting an apartment

The day before finals week, my roommate and I decided to find an apartment to live in during sophomore year. That was on Sunday.

On Monday, we met up with another girl and decided it would be the three of us living in the apartment.

On Tuesday, we visited the apartment, and a few hours later we were signing the lease.

We hardly looked around. We just saw a picture, decided we liked it, and were like, “Yeah, let’s do it.” We could’ve found a cheaper place. A way, way cheaper place. Not to mention, the apartment is a 30-minute walk from Kinnick Stadium and the football facility, which means I’ll probably need to invest in a bike to get to practice every day. 

I’m taking it as a learning experience. Next year, I’ll start looking for an apartment (or a house) a lot sooner and I’ll spend a lot of time looking to make sure I’m making a good decision.

Don’t order take-out all the time

During the summer I downloaded an app called Grubhub, which is an food ordering and delivery company. My parents knew it would prove to be a problem, and they weren’t wrong. 

I didn’t spend an insane amount of money, but I did order take-out a lot more often than I should have. My savings started to dwindle to a point where I had to delete the app because I apparently have no self-control

Don’t force yourself to become someone you’re not

When you go to college, you can re-invent yourself. You can be whoever you want to be; you can be whoever you were afraid to be. 

But make sure it’s still you. Make sure you’re still proud of yourself when you look in the mirror. 

Thank you for reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

 

How I’m Spending Winter Break

Now that my final exams and papers are completed, I can finally enjoy a month away from campus. Don’t get me wrong, it was a fun first semester and I learned a lot about myself, but it was a hard life to adapt to and I definitely deserve some time off from classes and homework.

The way I look at it, I have two options for break.

1) Do (literally) nothing

2) Be (somewhat) productive

While I do think both are practical, one is probably smarter than the other. I do deserve a break, but, at the same time, I can’t let myself become a complete couch potato. My time off should be a mix of productivity and relaxation.

So here’s what I’m looking forward to doing during Winter Break:

1. Seeing my family

I may fight with them a lot, but I still love my parents and siblings more than anything in this world. I know for a fact we’ll be playing a lot of Trivial Pursuit during the month I’m home.

2. Binge-watching TV shows

I have a long list of shows on Netflix that I need to watch (Black Mirror, The Crown, The Punisher, Scandal, Friends From College, and so on), and I hope to make at least a small dent in this list.

3. Reading (a lot of) books

Reading is my favorite way to pass time and I’m always looking for a good book. Since I’m a broke college student, I like finding websites that offer free books for me to indulge in.

4. Searching for a spring semester job

Last semester I was on the video staff for the football team, but I was only a volunteer so I wasn’t getting paid. And that was perfectly fine. I received a lot of free clothes and was able to stand on the sideline during home football games, as well as gain valuable experience in the sports industry. I’m still on the video staff as a volunteer (there’s a chance I’ll start getting paid Fall 2018), but I won’t be filming any football until late spring.

But being a broke college student – for the lack of a better word – sucks.

For that reason, I need to find a paying job to fill the void and start saving money. I’m hoping to find a job that involves a career I’m interested in, but, honestly, any job is a good job. I’ll still gain experience and improve certain skills.

5. Developing new routines

Looking back on this past semester, I didn’t really have much of a routine. I did homework whenever I felt like it and went to sleep at odd hours. And, honestly, that worked well for me. I only had four classes, a volunteer job (that I only worked two, maybe three, times a week), and a few student organizations. I had plenty of time to slack off and get away with it.

Next semester, however, is a different story. I’m going to be incredibly busy and I’m going to need some kind of routine to keep me from falling behind.

6. Catching up on sleep

Aforementioned, I went to sleep at odd hours during first semester. Some nights I’d go to bed at 10 or 11 p.m., while other nights I’d be up until four a.m. reading a book. On average, I probably got around 5 or 6 hours of sleep every night.

My goal for break is to try to go to bed early and then wake up at a respectable hour. Hopefully I’ll be getting at least seven, if not eight, hours of sleep each night.

7. Going to basketball games

I plan on going to a few of my high school’s home basketball games. Mostly because I like basketball, but also so I can see some people from high school that I haven’t seen in a while.

8. Writing and/or blogging

I love writing, but I have a lot of work to do if I want to become a really good writer in the future and (maybe) make a career out of it.

And it all starts with simply putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard).

9. Learning code

Code has always been something I was interested in learning. I never had the chance to take a class during high school, though, because I had other classes I needed to take to graduate, and I never knew where to start online.

Recently, I’ve been searching the web and found a few sites (Codecademy, Free Code Camp, and Codewars) with good reviews.

10. Learning a foreign language

I took four years of Spanish in high school and I really enjoyed it. I decided not to take any foreign language classes while in college, but I’d still like to stay somewhat fluent.

I haven’t been very on top of it lately, and I’m sure I’ve forgotten a lot, but I plan on changing that during break.

11. Applying for scholarships

College is expensive. I can only work so much while in school. I’m broke (have I reiterated that enough yet?).

And what’s better than free money? Absolutely nothing.

Thank you for reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

 

 

Finals Week: Avoiding Burnout

It’s almost Finals Week. 

Those two words are a lot more terrifying now that I’m in college compared to when I was in high school.

At my high school, I don’t remember there being a specific week dedicated to finals. Not to mention, the classes, in general, were a lot easier. Outside of a few math and science classes, I never really had to study in high school.

Now that I’m in college, however, I have to study. I learned that the hard way when I didn’t study for two midterm exams (oops, my bad).

And since I need to study for multiple exams taking place in the span of a week, I’m in danger of facing education burnout, which is defined as “exhaustion of physical or emotional strength or motivation usually as a result of prolonged stress or frustration.

I’d like to avoid that fate, if possible. For that reason, I put together a short list of ways to avoid burnout.

1. Make a study plan

I have two papers to write and three exams to study for within the next week. I’m getting anxious just thinking about all of that work, which is why I made a study plan to spread out my work evenly and avoid being overwhelmed.

2. Have three or four achievable goals each day

If I have a long list of things to do each day, I’ll just end up feeling bad about myself if I don’t accomplish all of it. In a sense, this goes hand-in-hand with spreading out my work evenly, except I’m not just talking about writing papers and studying for exams.

I have other tasks, unrelated to school, that I’d still like to complete each day despite devoting a good amount of time to school.

3. Take care of yourself

It’s important to remember to take a break. Don’t spend all day doing work.

Sleep. Eat. Shower. Talk to friends. 

Don’t isolate yourself in one room all week. You’ll go crazy.

4. Celebrate your accomplishments

Watch Netflix after studying. Go out to eat with a friend after taking an exam. Buy a new book (or something else you love) as a reward for your hard work.

Thank you for reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

College Classes: Creating Your Schedule

Back in June when I was creating my first semester class schedule at orientation, I didn’t really know what I was doing. My goal was to pick classes I thought I would enjoy and hope it all worked out in the end.

And, somehow it did.

However, I took a far different approach when it came to scheduling my second semester classes. Even though it’s my first year on Iowa’s campus, I’m a sophomore based on credit, so I plan on graduating in three years. While scheduling classes for next semester, I tried to include as many SRM (Sport and Recreation Management) and JMC (Journalism and Mass Communication) classes as I could in order to stay on track for both majors.

Here are a seven tips based on how I scheduled my classes:

1. Map out your (future) class schedules

You definitely don’t have to do this, but I’m the kind of person who loves to plan ahead.

A few weeks prior to picking second semester classes, I decided to make an excel document where I map out all of my future class schedules. The document includes a list of all the classes I need/want to take and the years that I should take them in order to graduate in three years, and a few other important details.

My plan will probably change, but it’s nice to have something to fall back on.

2. Maintain a balance

First semester, I had four classes (12 semester hours) because I was easing myself in to college. Second semester, I’m going to have six classes (18 semester hours, which is a full load).

If you can, I suggest taking a full load of classes as long as you maintain a balance. Try not to schedule all of your hard classes in one semester.

3. Make sure you have time for homework (or online classes)

I am taking one online class next semester for my SRM major. I made sure to make time in my schedule to work on homework for that class. On Mondays and Wednesdays, I don’t have class until late afternoon, which gives me plenty of time to focus on my online class. The last thing I want to do is fall behind.

4. Take your personality into account

During first semester, I confirmed that I am not a morning person unless I have something to really motivate me to get up. When I had to go to work and film football practice, I was able to wake up just fine. However, when I had a lecture before 10 a.m., I struggled to get out of bed because I knew no one would notice if I missed class.

I took that into account when scheduling my second semester classes.

5. Make time to eat

One of my biggest concerns was making sure I have time to eat lunch. I wanted to avoid having back-to-back-to-back classes during lunch hours.

6. Look at a campus map

I’d rather not have to run all the way across campus in 10 minutes to get to my next class.

7. Talk to your advisor

It’s possible that talking to your advisor is the most important part of scheduling college classes. Your advisor is there to advise you for a reason. They aren’t going to enroll in classes for you, but they will give you advice and lead you in the right direction. Use their knowledge to your advantage.

Thank you for reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my next post! And if you’d like to see more of my everyday life as an Iowa student, feel free to follow me on social media. Go Hawks!

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@kam_smithy

And so it begins…

If there’s one thing I’ve learned after one week of classes, it’s that procrastination is still my number one enemy. For example, I told myself I would submit my first blog post on Friday, the 25th.

And what day is it now? Monday, the 28th. And I’m rushing to finish writing it right before my second class starts.

While the first week of college was lacking in homework (yay for syllabus week), it was still incredibly hectic and productivity was a necessity. I had a million and one things I wanted, and needed, to do, but failed to even start. This was also a problem for me in high school, but the only difference is that I have a lot more going on now than I did back then.

On Monday, I had my first class (Contemporary Issues in Sports) at 9:30 am, and I didn’t have my second class (Inequality in American Sport) until 2:30 pm. This gap between classes provided me with the opportunity to at least do something productive, so I opted for doing my laundry in the residence hall for the first time. Getting my clothes in the washer was easy enough, but of course, with my luck, it all went downhill from there. When it came time to dry my clothes, I somehow managed to shove all of them into the bottom dryer, but ended up pressing the start button for the top dryer. I’m still not sure how I managed to make that mistake, but I ended up having to pay again. To top it off, when I came back to get my clothes after they finished drying, they were all still damp. For some crazy reason, I thought it was a good idea to put seven towels and a week’s worth of clothes in all at once.

Tuesday was when things started to get more hectic. While I didn’t have class until 12:30 pm, I had to be at football practice at seven in the morning. Being a videographer for the football team is fun, but I am in no way a morning person. After going to both of my Tuesday classes (Media History and Culture and Introduction to the Politics of Race) that afternoon, I hung out in my dorm room for a while. At five pm, we had our mandatory floor meeting where we introduced ourselves and talked about all of the things we had already gone over at orientation. At 9:15 pm, I had a KRUI sports department meeting where we discussed shows and show times. And at around 12 pm, I finally went to bed.

Wednesday was my busiest day in terms of classes. At 9:30 am, I had Contemporary Issues in Sports and right after that, at 10:30 am, I had the discussion for that class. And then, just like on Monday, I didn’t have my next (and last) class until 2:30 pm. I think I did a pretty good job at spacing out my classes and limiting the amount I have in one day in order to ease myself into college. On Wednesday night, I had an informational meeting for the Sport and Rec Management program. We found out about the different networking opportunities, met a lot of the staff, and had the chance to win a skip-the-line pass for the Chicago field trip (spoiler: I didn’t win). The trip would have consisted of a bus ride to Chicago to network and go to the Cubs vs. Braves game, but sadly I had prior commitments that prevented me from registering.

On Thursday, I only had two classes (Media History and Culture and Introduction to the Politics of Race). At 3:30 pm, I was supposed to have a meeting with my advisor at the Pomerantz Career Center, so I headed over there after my last class. When I got there, I found out that they had to cancel all of the meetings with my advisor because he hadn’t been there all week. They said they sent me an e-mail, but I never got it. Nevertheless, I headed back to my dorm room and relaxed for a while. At around five pm, I headed over to the Old Cap Mall for a Pizza Party with some of the other student bloggers. It was really cool to meet everyone and I can’t wait for the next one! That night, I had to go to bed early because I needed to be at the football facility for practice at six in the morning. Just as I was falling asleep, the fire alarm went off and everyone had to evacuate the building, which was just my luck.

On Friday morning, I walked to the football facility for practice. I got out of there around nine am, and then I had my discussion class for Inequality in American Sport at 10:30 am. After that, I had my discussion class for Media History and Culture at 1:30 pm. Once I was finished with classes, I went back to my dorm and started packing my bag.

Yes, I was already making a trip home. While I had yet to feel really homesick, I did miss my parents and siblings, and couldn’t wait to see them again.

My first week of college was full of a lot of changes, new experiences, and a few bumps in the road. I might have seen a cockroach in the girls’ bathroom once or twice (or maybe three times) and I might have gotten lost in Van Allen, but I wasn’t going to let any of that ruin my first week.

I would apologize for the super long, tell-instead-of-show post (believe me, they will not all be like this), but I think it “fits the bill” because it was definitely a super long week.

But I do have a feeling the weeks are only going to get longer.

 

See you next time, Hawks!